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Anthropology Links

Following these links will take you off CR's site.   Neither the College nor myself are responsible for any content hosted there.



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STUDENTS!!

5 Bonus Points® for a verifiable report of a broken link!

AND

5 Bonus Points®--that's Right! 5 more Bonus Points® for the correct new link!

OR

Send me links!  If I choose to post your submission of an "original, interesting, and educational" annotated link , you get 1 Bonus Point®.  There is a Maximum Limit of 10 Bonus points® which can be earned in this matter.

Results are credited at the end of the Semester! 


 

These sites are listed in no particular order and are roughly grouped by topic.

 



Peer-Reviewed: this is, IMHO, the best physical anthropology tutorial sites in existence. This is a site I strongly recommend for my ANTH 1 students.  It has a FABULOUS glossary, and links in-text provide additional resources including multi-media pronunciation.  Great illustrations, practice quizzes, and additional links.  This is a great resource and it should be bookmarked in a place where you can find it easily. 

http://anthro.palomar.edu/tutorials/


The Origin of Species; online text.  If you're in ANTH 1, this is the best site for Project 1. 

http://www.bartleby.com/11/


This site is one of the best I've found for the Geologic Time Scale.  If rocks and fossils are your thing, this should probably be your homepage.  You could spend hours here; I know I did.

http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/exhibit/geology.html


An Encyclopedia on Mythology, Folklore, and Legend.

http://www.pantheon.org/mythica.html


 

Anthropology Code of Ethics

 

AAA Code of Ethics


 

How to Do Ethnographic Research: A Concise Guide (an excellent site).

 

Ethnographic Methods

 


 

Be sure the sites you choose are reputable sources of information.  How can you tell? Try Perdue University’s Online Writing Lab: Evaluating Sources of Information—it’s long, but full of helpful advice to writers.

 

Evaluating Sources of Information

 


 

For help with MLA citations, try Capital Community College Library:  A Guide for Writing Research Papers Based on Modern Language Association (MLA) Documentation.  This is an excellent resource—again, lengthy.  Grab a cuppa coffee.

 

A Guide for Writing Research Papers

 


 

DNA  Click on "DNA Workshop Activity," then either "DNA Replication" or "Protein Synthesis"

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aso/tryit/dna/index.html


Cell Division.  The basics of mitosis and meiosis.  

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/miracle/divide.html


A site detailing cellular structures and processes.

http://www.biology.arizona.edu/cell_bio/cell_bio.html


Gray's Anatomy: online text.  The definitive classical work pertaining to human anatomy.  If you've got a question about how the human body is put together, this is the site for you!

http://www.bartleby.com/107/


The E-Skeleton Project.  this site, developed by University of Texas, Austin anthropologist John Kappelman, allows you compare the human skeleton to that of a gorilla, a chimpanzee and more.  Very nice site!

http://www.eskeletons.org/


This site features an excellent overview of human evolution, including an exhaustive glossary.

http://www.archaeologyinfo.com/index.html


This site explores the polemics between creationists and evolutionists.  This site is rather large, and will take awhile to navigate through.  Spend some time here and be sure to glance over the lovely illustrations and photographs. 

http://www.talkorigins.org/


A 3-D exploration of hominid fossil skulls.  Probably more than you thought you wanted to know about bones (but you never know what might be on a test somewhere, so better to be over-prepared!).

http://www.anth.ucsb.edu/projects/human/


Zeno's Forensic Sciences link:  a Portal to the macabre.  If forensic anthropology floats your boat, then this is the site for you. 

http://forensic.to/forensic.html


Midwest Bioarchaeology and Forensic Anthropology Association (BARFAA).  Ya gotta love scientists who come up with association names with BARF in it (especially when the members of said association routinely deal with the more icky side of death).

http://www.luc.edu/depts/anthropology/BARFAA/


Population Genetics and Heritability.

http://library.thinkquest.org/19037/population.html?tqskip1=1


The following link will take you to one of the best tutorials on the modern human skull on the web today.

http://www.csuchico.edu/anth/Module/skull.html


Osteointeractive.  One of the ultimate bone sites.

http://medlib.med.utah.edu/kw/osteo/index2.html


The University of Tennessee, Knoxville.  A site detailing their Master's Program.

http://web.utk.edu/~anthrop/


 


WARNING: The links below will take you to some sites which may NOT be suitable for especially sensitive viewers.  In other words, some of this stuff is downright icky or may possible offend someone.   If  you choose to visit these sites, neither the College nor myself will be responsible for therapy, cleaning bills, or the costs of resuscitation.  You have been warned.


Adipocere.  It's a fact of death.

http://adipocere.homestead.com/


"Part of you thinks it's in poor taste--part of you wants an XL."

http://www.lacoroner.com/ 


Don't be afraid...send me email.  I especially like suggestions for links...


V 3.3
Last Updated January 2008
Copyright 
April Garwin
2001-2008
All Rights Reserved