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Enhancing Cultural Competence & Reducing Implicit Bias: Achieving a High Quality, Diverse Workforce in the Redwoods Community College District

Event date: 10/3/2018 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM Export event


Date:  Wednesday, October 3, 2018

Time:  9:00 a.m. to Noon

Location:  AT 103/104

Please call 476-4192 or email wendy-bates@redwoods.edu to RSVP as a count is required for print materials to be prepared.

Content:

This workshop will provide an overview of relevant federal, state, California Community College, and District policies related to Equal Employment Opportunity.  It will describe the educational benefits of workforce diversity in California community colleges and at College of the Redwoods. It will support the elimination of bias in hiring decisions and identify individual and organizational best practices for reducing and eliminating bias for those serving on screening, selection, and/or hiring committees.  The workshop creates a safe, time compressed setting in which participants have the opportunity to listen respectfully, share, and learn to apply concepts in their personal and professional lives.

The workshop will define cultural competence, describe the many kinds of diversity that matter most in the U.S., and highlight the reality that our identities are actually a combination of many aspects (intersectionality). It will demonstrate that culture is learned and that biases, stereotypes, beliefs and behaviors are the result of being born in particular places (e.g., families, communities, social organizations) at particular points in time.  It presents research finding that human beings need “bias” to survive and that virtually everyone is biased toward or against some things or some people. 

Biases operate at the conscious level—what we choose to believe and/or what we want others to think we believe,  Biases also operate at the subconscious level—automatic, associations about people that tumble out before we’ve had time to think.  Research finds that implicit biases have a negative impact on academic and workplace performance. Participants will be asked to take one of the Harvard Implicit Association Tests and to share their feelings and thoughts about their experiences, without having to disclose their individual results.  Finally, the workshop will provide an overview of “microaggressions” and how well-intentioned people can send messages to people from marginalized groups while being unaware of the hidden messages they are communicating.

 

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